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Follow this CPAP therapy timeline to achieve success

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

For those starting continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy (or other types of PAP therapy) for the first time, there are lots of unknowns to consider. We try to take the fear of the unknown out of the process because we know that the better prepared and educated you are about your therapy, the more likely you will succeed in using it. And in doing so, you can conquer the risks and consequences associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Here is a handy timeline to give you an idea what the next few weeks will look like as you begin to use your CPAP machine. It also shows you our commitment to providing you support, 24-7, at the beginning and throughout the lifespan of your therapy. Let's treat your OSA together!

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The truth about pregnancy and sleep apnea: Know your risks... treatment is easy

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

Learn more about sleep apnea as it relates to: 

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Untreated sleep apnea and high blood pressure: Risks, causes, and correlations

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

There are people who have been diagnosed with some form of sleep apnea who have not taken the critical step of starting therapy for it. 

They may mistakenly believe they can "live" with their sleep apnea, or they may be intimidated by treatment options (or not know about their options at all). 

Unfortunately, if they don't treat their sleep apnea, they are practically guaranteeing that they will either develop high blood pressure (hypertension) as a result, or aggravate a preexisting case of it.

What makes this even worse is that both sleep apnea and hypertension are silent conditions, in that it can be impossible for some people to know they have either without a full medical assessment. 


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Alternative therapies for treating your sleep apnea

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

The most common approaches for treating all sleep health problems include:

  • Prescriptive devices 
  • Surgical
  • Pharmaceutical 
  • Behavioral

All of these, of course, require you to undergo diagnostic observation by a sleep specialist in order to receive your differential diagnosis and to start treatment.

For sleep-breathing disorders—obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), in particular—some of the treatment options listed here aren’t available.

Prescriptive devices such as continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) constitute the lion’s share of approaches for most sleep apnea concerns. However, those who may not be able to tolerate positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy aren’t stuck without options.

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that requires therapeutic assistance from a host of medical professionals (primary care physicians, pulmonologists, allergy specialists, and dentists); together, they can offer a number of avenues for treatment to help patients recover from dangerous sleep breathing patterns that will otherwise negatively impact their health directly over the roughly one third of their lives spent in sleep.

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How to exercise your way to sleep apnea relief

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

Most people understand that both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)—a mechanical dysfunction of breathing during sleepand central sleep apnea (CSA)a neurological dysfunction of breathing during sleephave long-term negative impacts on health.

What we don't always think about is how having sleep apnea may impair us during the day, when we're awake

A common side effect of sleep apnea is excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), which may be the most commonly understood adverse effect of having this sleep-breathing disorder.

However, poor breathing during sleep can also lead to poor breathing during exercise during the day.

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FAST FACTS: Is it possible for sleep apnea to be genetic?

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) certainly can be said to run in families.

Although there is no such thing as a "sleep apnea gene," there are three ways you can look at family traits as evidence you are likely to develop it:

  1. Genetic predisposition
  2. Family resemblance
  3. Lifestyle and environment
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Sleep Medicine Acronyms (From APAP to Zzzz): Part 4, S-Z

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

It can be frustrating trying to understand medical jargon of any kind. Sleep medicine acronyms are no exception.

Here is a series on abbreviations you are likely to encounter during your visits to a sleep specialist or sleep center. 

This fourth section highlights terms that start with the letters S through Z.

See also: 

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Sleep Medicine Acronyms (From APAP to Zzzz): Part 3, N-R

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

It can be frustrating trying to understand medical jargon of any kind. Sleep medicine acronyms are no exception.

Here is a series on abbreviations you are likely to encounter during your visits to a sleep specialist or sleep center. 

This third section highlights terms that start with the letters N through R.

See also: 

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Sleep Medicine Acronyms (From APAP to Zzzz): Part 2, E-M

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

It can be frustrating trying to understand medical jargon of any kind. Sleep medicine acronyms are no exception.

Here is a series on abbreviations you are likely to encounter during your visits to a sleep specialist or sleep center. 

This second section highlights terms that start with the letters E through M.

See also: 

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Sleep Medicine Acronyms (From APAP to Zzzz): Part 1, A-D

Tamara Kaye Sellman, RPSGT, CCSH

It can be frustrating trying to understand medical jargon of any kind. Sleep medicine acronyms are no exception.

Here is a series on abbreviations you are likely to encounter during your visits to a sleep specialist or sleep center. 

This first section highlights terms that start with the letters A through D.

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